What Does The A Stand For On Hockey Jersey? [Expert Review!]

Spread the love

The acronym stands for “Authentic”. So, whenever you see the letters “A”, “J”, and “N” on a hockey jersey, you can be sure that the player is an authentic National Hockey League (NHL) designer.

The NHL is the highest level of competition in the hockey league system and the best players in the world flock to the NHL for the chance to play for the teams there.

The NHL had its official beginning in June 1917 with eight teams and just over 500 players. The league has since grown to its present size of 30 teams and over 1000 players. There are currently 1700 NHL jerseys on the market, with a wide variety of colors and styles to choose from.

The A Designates The Home Country

The A stylistically indicates the home country of the player whose jersey is displayed on the ice.

The NHL started using country codes for their jerseys in the early 1990s, starting with the traditional white with blue NHL logo on the front and the red and blue national flag on the back in 1992 for Canada, the United States of America, and Mexico. Later that season, the NHL added an A designator for Argentina, which is now a trademark on the back of their jerseys (and socks, lacrosse headwear, etc.). Then, in 1996, the NHL started using an A country code for all of their 30 teams to identify the team of origin for the players on their jerseys (e.g., ANA for Argentina and LAK for Slovakia (now the Croatia team)).

The J Designates The City Of Birth

The J is used to designate the city of birth of the player whose jersey is worn on the ice.

Like the A stylistically, the J stylistically indicates the home country of the player whose jersey is displayed on the ice. However, while the A designates the player’s home country, the J designates the city of birth of the player. So, if a player were to wear a blue Toronto Maple Leaf jersey, he would be indicating that he is from Toronto and that Maple Leaf is his home city.

The NHL first started using maps on their jerseys in the early 1990s, with a map of Canada displayed on the front of all NHL jerseys beginning in 1992 (for the original eight teams). The maps on the NHL jerseys have changed over the years to reflect the hockey consumption and awareness of that particular market. For instance, in 2012, the NHL added a map of Google Earth to their jersey backdrop, while also adding an S to their naming plots (Street is now a street in the map and S for Shark, the NHL hockey team in Dallas, Texas).

The NHL started using city codes for their jerseys in the early 1990s, with the names of the seven American cities for which they have Jersey City A Designators (including New York and San Francisco) and the four Canadian cities for which they have Montreal A Designators (including Toronto and Vancouver).

The N Designates The Organization Name

The last letter of the acronym N is used to identify the organization whose jersey the player wears on the ice.

Organizations use jerseys to identify themselves on the ice, and the N stylistically indicates that the player is associated with the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League in New York City.

This designation was initially used for just the Rangers team, but is now trademarked by the NHL and applies to all of their organizations (including the Rangers and all of their teams, officially and unofficially).

For the most part, the NHL jerseys are commodified versions of their on-ice equivalent striped shirt, with the organization logo on the chest and a stylized N on the sleeve.

The L Designates The Player’s Last Name

The L is the last name of the player whose jersey is worn on the ice.

The NHL started using last names on jerseys in the early 1990s, with just two teams using last names initially: the Quebec Avalanche and the Toronto Maple Leaf. However, since then, the NHL has been a landslide of last name usage, with the current total now at 1700 NHL jerseys with a last name.

The NHL started using last names on their jerseys to distinguish players who were European (mostly From England, Scotland, and Wales) from the rest of the league in the early 1990s, with only seven teams using just first names on the field in 1992. Today, all NHL teams are mostly made up of North Americans (with a few European teams in the wild East).

The C Designates The Club Name

The C is the name of the hockey club whose jersey the player wears on the ice.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!